So you want to swim your first mile?

In News by Swim Gym

The 4-Week Plan to Swimming Your First Mile

It is possible that in one month from now, you can say you’ve swum a mile. Following this training plan and keeping these * beginner swim tips in mind, you can get into the best shape of your life in a matter of weeks. Like any new fitness routine, this program starts off slow and continues to increase in yardage. Stick with freestyle (for now), and do each workout three times a week with a rest day in between. Let us know how it goes!

 

Week 1

Warmup: 200 yards
1 x 200 yards — easy (rest as needed)
Endurance: 400 yards
2 x 200 yards — moderate (rest 1:30 minute in between)
Intervals: 200 yards
2 x 100 yards — build speed (rest 1 minute in between)
Warm down: 100 yards
4 x 25 yards — easy (rest as needed)

Total: 900 yards

Week 2

Warmup: 200 yards
1 x 200 yards — easy (rest as needed)
Endurance: 600 yards
6 x 100 yards — moderate (rest 1 minute in between)
Intervals: 300 yards
6 x 50 yards — first lap fast, second lap moderate (rest 30 seconds in between)
Warm down: 100 yards
1 x 100 yards — easy (rest as needed)

Total: 1200 yards

Week 3

Warmup: 300 yards
1 x 300 yards — easy (rest as needed)
Endurance: 600 yards
3 x 200 yards — moderate (rest 1 minute in between)
Intervals: 400 yards
4 x 100 yards — make the first 100 easy, building up to a fast fourth 100 (rest 30 seconds in between)
Warm down: 100 yards
4 x 25 yards — easy (rest as needed)

Total: 1400 yards

Week 4

Warmup: 400 yards
2 x 200 yards — easy (rest as needed)
Endurance: 600 yards
3 x 300 yards — moderate (rest 1:30 minute in between)
Intervals: 450 yards
9 x 50 yards — 3 x 50 easy, 3 x 50 moderate, 3 x 50 fast (rest 15 seconds in between)
Warm down: 200 yards
2 x 100 yards — easy (rest as needed)

Total: 1650 yards (1 mile!)

* Beginner swimmer tips

Explore Equipment and Drills

Unlike running, swimming strokes are not comprised of natural movements. To explore the strokes and your body position, use equipment like fins, paddles, and a kickboard. Drills are used to help you become more familiar with your stroke and make changes to your technique. There are a number of common swimming drills that you can try, but feel free to play around and create your own drills.

Take Care

Swimming is not a walk in the park. Because of this, it’s important to be mindful of your recovery practices, especially if you’re just starting out. Water resistance can be very taxing on your shoulders, meaning it’s important to get a good stretch after every swim (a stretch rope can help!). Those myths about serious swimmers and calorie intake aren’t false either. One hour of moderate swimming can burn around 500 calories. Be sure to fuel up with a post-workout drink or healthy snack.